Therapy Exam Prep – Prepare for the NPTE | NPTAE Online TEP teaches clinical thinking as it applies to the PT exam. The NPTE and NPTAE are no longer purely academic exams and your preparation should reflect that. 2017-11-05T07:02:47Z https://therapyexamprep.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Miye https://therapyexamprep.com <![CDATA[PT Exam Scores – What to Aim For on NPTE Practice Exams]]> https://therapyexamprep.com/?p=3120 2017-11-05T07:02:47Z 2017-11-05T07:02:47Z “What’s the bare minimum score I need to get for passing?” or “What score do I need to achieve to pass?” If you have asked that, seen or heard it asked, you’re not alone. However, by asking this question, you are essentially saying: what’s the score I can get on the PT exam with the […]

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“What’s the bare minimum score I need to get for passing?” or “What score do I need to achieve to pass?”

If you have asked that, seen or heard it asked, you’re not alone. However, by asking this question, you are essentially saying: what’s the score I can get on the PT exam with the least amount of understanding to get a piece of paper that has a license number. Meaning: I’m not really into making myself be the best I can be to help people as I start my PT career.

Risk of Aiming for the Bare Minimum Score

If all you do is to aim for the bare minimum on the PT exam, then expect that you may fall short of the goal. You are only giving yourself two-thirds of a chance to actually pass. So, 67%. That percentage wouldn’t even get you a passing grade in a course. So, you are targeting less than what is expected of you from any courses that you have taken as a student. Here’s the thing — for one exam you could be right at a passing score, another exam below passing and another exam slightly over passing. Do you really want to gamble on those “chances”?

Let’s bring this to the clinic, what you’re saying is that you’ll only really helping 6.7 patients out of 10 for that day. How good would your reputation be at work if you are subpar treating patients? Essentially, when given 10 treatments, 3 of your treatments will not work at all. How many referrals would you actually get out of 6 patients? 

So, let’s say you fell below this minimum score; how does this translate to treating patients? From above, you’ll have the 3 that you didn’t end up “fixing.” Those that don’t get “fixed”, you’ll have to look further as to why they weren’t successful or into their complaints. For instance, did they really actively do what was asked for them to do? Or did they just brush things off, have a closed mind and disregard guidance?

If they didn’t reach out, they externally blame others for their lack of responsibility on their progress. They are seen more as negative people who want to air out things that may not be the full truth about how much actual effort they put forth. Honestly, you know if they did their exercises and are diligent. Those who don’t make progress usually have an excuse as to the reason why or they flat out say things don’t work without really putting in the effort.

This also relates back to those preparing for the exam when things don’t go their way or get the score they were expecting. There are several reasons why a score is below passing; such as test-taking errors, anxiety, content knowledge application, lack of confidence, negative mindset and much more. However, it’s more about what you do afterward to improve on the result than dwelling on a lower than expected score.

It’s the Number Not the Percentage

After getting the results from a practice exam, be sure to focus on the number of questions you got right instead of the percentages. A percentage may give you a false sense of confidence on how you are doing. When you take different practice exams from various sources, the difficulty can range significantly. To truly know how well you are improving and to keep the same standard, track the number of questions instead of the percentages. As most practice exams out there are not the full length, it’s harder to estimate how well you’ll actually perform with an extra section.

Since most practice exams out there vary by difficulty and the number of questions, progress is shown more clearly by focusing on the number of questions correct rather than a percentage. If you relate this to having the patient rate their pain from 0 – 10. It’s easier for you to be consistent among all practice exams when you are looking at the number of questions correct regardless of difficulty.

Forgetting to Buffer

When only aiming for the bare minimum score (let’s use 135 that is commonly heard), this doesn’t allow for any buffer on the exam itself. This is similar to looking at and aiming for the trapeze bar out in the middle of the air; however, after you jump towards the bar with arms extended, you realize you jumped too short and missed that bar. Below, there’s help to bring you down slowly but missing the bar can make jumping again harder by your mind bring up thoughts of missing again. It’s the same with the PT exam; so when you aim for a passing score, the best situation is to allow for an additional 20 – 30 questions to buffer you. This would let you feel better while you wait for your score results to show up.

This extra amount of questions to aim for, allows you to breathe more at ease when waiting for your results and raise your confidence that you have passed. The amount of stress during this horrible wait period only increases your “examzilla” impatience and you’re not so pleasant to be around at this time. Don’t be that person!

Thinking Big Jumps in Short Period of Time

Time is ticking down to the big exam day, so you’re hoping to have big gains — but — life keeps getting in the way. These unexpected or procrastinating times, where the academic cramming or pulling all-nighters, actually may backfire on you. Here’s the thing: to pay attention to the patient questions, you have to actively listen to what they are telling you in written form. However, beware of the expectation you can make over 40 points or something crazy like 120 points in 2 weeks — you’ll want to be realistic. You may be able to increase by 10 or 20; however, to pull off the NPTE without adequate preparation is hard. This hoping or guessing can only lead to guessing on questions, changing of answers and a lot of overanalyzing and this causes many points to be lost. Each point here and there, a string of them can add up by the time you get to the last section.

I’ve heard about candidates stop taking the exam and estimate how many they have already missed and how much they can miss till the end of the exam. This is not how we want to be seen or portrayed by others in the profession. We want to be competent and at the same level, so let’s aim to take small steps each day to make big strides over a longer period of time.

Don’t Compare Yourself to Others

Rather than asking what others are getting on their practice PT exams, focus on how well you can perform. This is what will matter in the end when preparing for your board exam. Comparing yourself to others only creates an internal anxiety and added pressure or even frustration when not doing well. If you find that you are comparing yourself and not doing well, this can easily create negativity and being hard on yourself. When you see that you are not improving, then even more frustrations or mistakes are made. So, instead of a negative downward spiral, focus on what you can do to improve your scores. This includes what your mindset is towards the exam, your mental and physical endurance, how good you are as a test-taker and how well you can relate to the material clinically.

What you do want to focus on with each practice exam is whether you are improving, staying the same or going the other direction. In each case, you’ll want to analyze what you did right and continue doing that and then look to see where you can improve. This includes timing, number of answers you have changed, recognizing whether you missed a question because you rushed or overanalyzed. Reflecting and assessing areas and then making mini goals to what you can improve on for the next time will keep you on the success track.

When you see a score that isn’t where you want to be, first thing, don’t get down or beat yourself up. This is a game and so objectively you want to assess: what do you think prevented you from obtaining a successful score? By doing this exercise, you’ll gain more insight on what you can do to improve the next time.

It Trickles Down to Your Patients

The amount of effort you put in is also what will be mimicked by your patients. So, if they see you did or think that the bare minimum is ok, then the progress for them will also be subpar. Remember, you are a model of the healthcare profession and just like kids, the patients will look to you for guidance. They will follow your instructions only for what is presented to them and keep in mind most won’t give their full effort. You’ll want to encourage them to do so and with that, you are also encouraged to go beyond the bare minimum to pass.

Be Aware of Those That Just State You Need X to Pass

If all you want to do is pass with the bare minimum on the NPTE, this mentality can cause unnecessary stress when waiting for the results. This where I see many candidates worry, hope, pray and wish to see a passing result. This all can be eliminated with proper preparation and having solid PT exam scores prior to the actual exam. There are many exam versions and so when someone claims “all you need is x” it’s not necessarily true. If you are looking at percentages (FSBPT prefers not to focus on this but actual numbers) for passing and someone states “all you need is like 75%”, you’ll want to actually aim higher to be confident on passing.

Translates to Confidence

Many PTs and PTAs don’t want to take the exam again and those that have passed will tell you, they never want to face this exam again. There tends to be a correlation with candidates who score higher also have higher confidence. Those who score lower tend to have lower confidence and worry more about their results.

What’s the difference between those who are confident and those who are not as confident? It has to do with how they are able to handle a question without freaking out when taking the PT exam. Those who are confident, feel they can answer simpler and harder questions with ease as opposed to those who don’t know what to do when an unfamiliar topic shows up. At times, those who are not as confident also get thrown off by wording or something that wasn’t in the textbook or study guides. It’s also not so much of how much content material you know, but rather what you can do with the information presented in front of you to make the right decision.

So, What Score Should I Aim For?

Rather than looking to see what the bare minimum score is to get, work towards doing your best. Aim high and although you may not get every question right, the goal should be to help as many patients as you can for that day. The more you help, the better you’ll do. A confident and solid score would be to aim for 180 or higher. If you think that’s too high, then you’re saying that you don’t want to help all the patients get better. This number of questions right gives you that buffer to confidently walk out of the exam without having to worry about the PT exam results. Having a score of 165 plus gives some breathing room on the actual exam while a score of 135 may have you at risk of falling short with no buffer.

On any given day, your score could fluctuate depending on different external and internal factors. So, to reduce the anxiety and stress, preparation is key and being able to tackle the exam from multiple aspects – your mindset, how well you are able to apply your knowledge clinically and how well you perform as a test-taker. The combination helps for the best outcome that you can get to succeed on the exam. Bottomline — do your best to be able to help as many patients as you can.

As the days get closer to the actual exam, read about switching your NPTE Mindset into “Getting into the Zone”.

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Miye https://therapyexamprep.com <![CDATA[General 2018 NPTE Changes]]> https://therapyexamprep.com/?p=3045 2017-09-05T03:56:37Z 2017-09-05T03:56:37Z It’s that time again, where there are updates and changes made to the National Physical Therapist Exam (NPTE) and National Physical Therapist Assistant Exam (NPTAE). Every 5 years, the Federation of State Board of Physical Therapy (FSBPT) changes the blueprint format for the physical therapist (PT) and physical therapy assistant (PTA) exams. The changes are […]

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It’s that time again, where there are updates and changes made to the National Physical Therapist Exam (NPTE) and National Physical Therapist Assistant Exam (NPTAE). Every 5 years, the Federation of State Board of Physical Therapy (FSBPT) changes the blueprint format for the physical therapist (PT) and physical therapy assistant (PTA) exams. The changes are made to correspond with the current standards of practice at the entry level. The new format will be effective starting in January 2018.

This process of changes begins a few years prior to the new format being released, starting with a survey sent out to practicing clinicians. These surveys are then analyzed to provide information on what’s considered important to the practice of critical work areas and what’s considered not work related activities. These are then compiled to provide a practice analysis and guidelines for writing questions for the exams. Below are the activities that pertain to the particular exam.

PT Critical Work Activities

PT Non-Critical Work Activities

PTA Critical Work Activities

PTA Non-Critical Work Activities

Are There Major Changes in the New Format?

No, there are not a lot of major changes in the new format. There a few notable changes to be aware of; however, nothing drastically changes what you need to know to pass your board exam. If you think about it, it’s more about shifting items around to make sure the important aspects are covered as the needs in the clinic change over time. So, there’s no reason to panic over the new changes which are explained below.

Lymphatic System

The new format does take out the Lymphatics system from the CardioPulmonary System and makes it its own system. This “new” system has its own set of focus questions that you are being tested on and classified under the “Other Systems”. This isn’t any different than before when you were expected to know the same information, it is just categorized differently. By adding this new system, the number of questions being asked in the remaining systems and content sections are decreased.

Gastrointestinal System

For PTs

A few questions are added to the examination content section; otherwise, everything else has the same number of questions. The key is being able to recognize pain referrals and other interventions to implement.

For PTAs

A few less questions may be asked in the Disease / Conditions and Intervention content sections.

Genitourinary System

For PTs

A few more questions are added in the evaluation content section.

For PTAs

This is similar to the gastrointestinal system where a few less questions are asked in the Disease / Conditions and intervention content sections.

System Interactions

With System Interactions, it’s the only system that focuses on one content section for questions to be tested on. This content section is Evaluation for PTs and for PTAs is the Disease and Conditions. For both PTs and PTAs, the number of questions being asked and tested are increased.

Updated Content Outlines / Candidate Handbook

With the new NPTE and NPTAE blueprint format, new content outlines are provided. Below are the updated content outlines and candidate handbook to prepare for the PT and PTA exams starting in 2018.

PT Content Outline

PTA Content Outline

PT and PTA Candidate Handbook

Are There Changes to the Passing Score of the Exam?

It’s not known yet whether the new exam format will have changes to the passing score. Both PTs and PTAs have had their Standard Settings Meetings and the results of these meetings will be out later and updated.

Any Changes to Fees?

Yes, for those registering for the NPTE, there will be an increased fee for the application. The new fee will now be $485.

Are There New Eligibility Requirements in 2018?

Yes, starting in mid-2018; candidates will have to show proof of TOEFL completion and proof of educational equivalence.

2018 Eligibility Requirements

To understand the exam itself, you can learn more information about the NPTE and how the questions are derived.

In Conclusion….

There’s no need to get anxious about the upcoming changes or get freaked out by others who tell you ‘the sky is falling’. The truth is it’s not all that different from before. Thinking the new exam format is so different is a mindset that should be quickly changed as it only makes studying harder than necessary. And, no, you don’t have to know everything to pass the NPTE. Bottomline, be proactive on your preparation and think clinically to be successful.

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Miye https://therapyexamprep.com <![CDATA[PT Exam – What Your NPTE Score Means]]> https://therapyexamprep.com/?p=3007 2017-07-27T21:13:10Z 2017-07-25T00:03:20Z Oh, the wait is unbearable! How cruel that others already know and you may still be glued to the computer screen hitting the refresh button on the FSBPT site to see your PT exam results. Could this day drag on any longer? The minutes seem to be stretching out into hours. Why Aren’t the Results […]

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Oh, the wait is unbearable! How cruel that others already know and you may still be glued to the computer screen hitting the refresh button on the FSBPT site to see your PT exam results. Could this day drag on any longer? The minutes seem to be stretching out into hours.

Why Aren’t the Results Released to Everyone at Once?

Results are released by the licensing jurisdiction and there’s no particular order on when yours may be released.  

And My Score Is….

PASS, FAIL or WITHHELD. Your actual score won’t be displayed at this time and will be available in a couple of days. Here’s what each one means:

PASS – Congratulations! Your studying and preparation have paid off. Now, it’s time to wait for when you actually receive your license from the corresponding jurisdiction.

FAIL – Oh, no! A range of feelings may come on ranging from disbelief, shock, frustration, anger or sadness. Although it looks like a few too many questions weren’t answered correctly, keep your head up, you’ll have another shot at the exam.

WITHHELD – What?! Unfortunately, you’ll have to wait a little longer. Don’t automatically think it means you failed. For whatever reason, either the Prometric center indicated an irregularity while you were taking the exam or the FSBPT noticed a score jump. It could also mean just be a random check. Either an email or a link to the survey is sent to you with a series of questions that you’ll want to promptly reply to in order to get your results within a week period of time. To learn more, visit the FSBPT website here:

Withheld Scores FAQs

Why Isn’t My Score Provided with the Results?

It’s up to the jurisdiction to provide you with the score. At times, the licensing jurisdiction may want to provide additional information with your score in order to obtain your license.

Do I Need to Pass In Every Area of the Exam to Pass?

No, your PT exam score is based on a compensatory score. This means that all systems and content sections are totaled in order to determine whether the exam status meets the passing criteria. The scaled score to pass is 600 and the range is from 200 to 800. So, you could have scored high in one system or content section and also have a lower section that is below the passing criteria for that particular portion and still pass.

Is the Score Based on a Curve? (Highest Score and Then Scaled Down)

No, the passing criteria have been pre-determined prior to the PT exam being given. The score is not scaled down from the highest scoring candidate. Each PT exam has its own independent difficulty rating and passing score criteria.

Is there Any Adjustment on the Cutoff Score?

Each year, there’s a minor adjustment to the cutoff score by 1 to 2 points.

How Many Questions Did I Need to Get Correct?

The FSBPT provides several different PT exams and you were randomly given one of them. With each PT exam, the number of questions needed to pass varies. So, when you hear “All you need is X to pass” be hesitant as that is not necessarily true. Just because one candidate passes with a certain score, that doesn’t mean you would pass with the same score. Avoid spreading this misconception to other candidates.

Why is it that I Didn’t Pass Even with a Higher Score Than My Friend?

Your exam may have been a slightly easier version and therefore required a higher number of questions to be answered correctly to reach that passing score. There’s a standard deviation of a couple of questions for the different exams.

What’s the Point of the Extra 50 Questions?

The extra 50 experimental questions are there to “test” the validity of that particular question on your entry level knowledge. The results of these experimental questions determine whether they are cycled into the actual exam as scored, need further refinement, or thrown out completely.

Is Only One PT Exam Given at the Prometric Center?

No, there are several different PT exam versions that are given out at the same Prometric Center. Let’s say that there are 4 candidates taking the exam at the same time and if seated near each other, there’s a high probability that each of these candidates is given a different exam. This is to prevent copying or cheating among candidates.

Are the PT Exams Different From State to State?

No, each state has the same PT exams that are given out to all candidates.

Will I Get a Score Report?

A free score report of your NPTE is available in another 3-4 days from when you get your initial result. Usually, you’ll see the score report after 10 days from when you took the exam and can be seen on the FSBPT website and accessible for 30 days. Since the score report has already been released to the jurisdiction, you can pay to see the score report before the 10 days by paying a fee of $80. Learn more about how to do that here:

Individual Score Report

Will I Get a Breakdown of My Exam Performance?

At your result screen, you won’t see a breakdown of your exam performance. In order to do that, you can request a Performance Feedback Report from the FSBPT. To learn more about the steps to get one for a $90 fee click here:

NPTE Performance Feedback Report

What’s the Difference Between the Score Report and the Performance Feedback Report?

The individual score report just provides your score. The performance feedback report provides a more detailed analysis for you breaking it down into 3 components:

Content Area

This breakdown is your exam performance

Body Systems

This provides your performance on how well you did by systems

By Section

This provides how well you performed per section on the exam

What Happens Now if I Didn’t Pass?

If this is your first attempt and didn’t succeed, you’ll be allowed to retake the exam an additional two times in a 12 month period with the same application you have submitted.

If this isn’t your first attempt, you may be required to take a remedial course or to fulfill other requirements before sitting for the exam again. The licensing jurisdiction may contact you with further information after an unsuccessful attempt.

If this is your third attempt, you’ll have to wait until after the 12 month period. You’ll also have to resubmit an application.

Some licensing jurisdiction may require candidates to take a remedial course or to fulfill other requirements before sitting for the exam again. The number of attempts and requirements vary depending on the licensing state.

Learn more on: The NPTE or having to retake the exam.

Can I Appeal My Results?

Yes, you can appeal your NPTE results if you have failed. You would have to contact the FSBPT via email: npte@fsbpt.org. It does cost money and take additional time for the FSBPT to have an answer. It may be tempting if you missed passing by 1 or 2 points; however, there’s been very little success on overturning a PT exam result.

Your Results Will Be Out Soon

It’s just a matter of time now for you to receive your results, in the meantime, take a deep breath. Regardless of your results, keep in mind that you want to avoid sharing any information about the actual exam with others.

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Miye https://therapyexamprep.com <![CDATA[PT Exam – The NPTE Mindset – Getting Into the Zone]]> https://therapyexamprep.com/?p=2874 2017-04-25T21:41:59Z 2017-04-25T21:41:59Z In the upcoming days, you’re about to take a very important exam – your board license exam. It’s common to feel anxious and nervous and there are many others in the same position as you. You may even feel like your mind is overwhelmed with material but also with thoughts about the PT exam itself […]

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In the upcoming days, you’re about to take a very important exam – your board license exam. It’s common to feel anxious and nervous and there are many others in the same position as you. You may even feel like your mind is overwhelmed with material but also with thoughts about the PT exam itself – ultimately being able to pass.

At the Prometric Center

When at the Prometric Center, the anticipation before checking in and the unknown of the exam can produce butterflies in the stomach and the mind racing in all different directions. While waiting to get checked in for your exam and looking around at the others could even make you more nervous as they also portray nervousness of their own. The hurry-up feeling may come on to get this exam over with already.

Once you are escorted into the room and shown your station. You can then sit down in front of your computer. Before even getting started, your heart may be racing, your palms sweating, maybe even your teeth clenching. Unconsciously, you may experience your leg shaking or maybe the fingers are tapping on the table (annoying the person next to you) as you stare at the screen before you.

This is it — a do or die (sort of) situation. But it’s JUST a PT exam! OK, a very important exam; the exam that determines whether you will be licensed or not. However, it’s not JUST a regular PT exam. It’s an exam that’s going to test you in many different aspects and right now it’s about how quickly you can get into the zone to focus.

Inner Mind Dialogue

There’s going to be chatter in your mind, a brief moment (or maybe the whole time) of “OMG!” and panic. There’s also the “I got this” attitude — the confidence of being able to handle any question presented to you. The “I may not know everything but I know enough” and be able to choose the best answer. At any given moment, a complicated question may pop up on your screen and the automatic of “Holy sh*t!” may come into your mind of “What do I do with this information?!” But you’ll be ok — trust me, you’ll be fine — as long as you are able to focus back on the question at hand.

But here’s the key to this PT exam, you want to get into the zone as fast as possible. What this means is to be ready and treat this more like a game than a PT exam. You want to treat the question as a patient. So, imagine you are sitting in front of the patient and they present their “problem” question to you — it’s up to you to choose their MOST appropriate treatment.

Getting into the Zone

Before starting your exam, clear your mind and if needed, crack your neck and knuckles to release tension. Take a moment before starting the tutorial and channel your energy into visualizing how you want to be able to answer the upcoming questions. Think of how you want the perfect question that you can answer with ease. That you will be able to see that you can handle any type of questions and eliminating answers are easy. There’s no second guessing or self-doubting as all the information is there. Now, begin with gusto and confidence.

Approaching the Questions

As each new patient question comes onto the screen, tell yourself you know enough to be able to help them. Actively listen to them by giving them your full attention, don’t interject with your own thoughts and assumptions. And don’t panic when what the patient presents to you is in your weaker areas — just take what you can and help them the best you can. When you have questions that you are strong on, don’t rush through them; however, take what you can in stride and smile that you are able to truly help.

Regardless, of the length of the question, the goal is the same — to choose the best answer. When a long case scenario is shown, the tendency is to feel overwhelmed especially when there are a lot of numbers, list of symptoms or examination results (MMT, ROM, special tests); however, the goal should be at this moment in time, to narrow down what you need to know and then begin elimination of unnecessary answers (or even the information presented in the question).

When a short case scenario is presented, you may feel there’s not enough information there! However, there’s enough for you to get by and choose an answer. This is the time to not fall into the trap of adding information or inserting your experience on the topic. Take the question at face value and don’t overthink the answers.

Choosing Your Answers

After reading the question, take each answer as an option. Know that there’s only 1 correct answer and it’s up to you to pick the best treatment answer. Prioritize and think about safety. Remember, when part of the answer is not true, don’t make it true — eliminate and use the strikethrough feature.

When doubting your answers, ALWAYS stick with your gut answer. This instinctual choice of yours, the majority of the time will be the correct answer. However, this is not the time to talk yourself out of an answer. Only change an answer when you know it’s absolutely not true. Otherwise, leave it. Most points are lost by doing this — so (tip!) — don’t do it! Pick and move on. This will also save you a lot of time.

After you have chosen an answer and before you click “Next,” let go of that question (patient). Don’t allow your mind to be clouded when seeing the next patient scenario. Give them your full attention — if that means closing your eyes for a brief second, do so. It’s hard to choose the right treatment when your mind is full and thinking about previous questions or when distracted by the time. Stay focused and you’ll be able to answer better and maybe even get a higher score.

Gaining Focus

It’s normal to feel anxious at the beginning (ok, maybe even in the middle and at the end of the PT exam); however, when you are able to quickly focus on what’s in front of you and begin to get into a rhythm of looking at your patients, you’ll seem to flow better. In a sense, you’ll get into a groove of being able to answer without losing focus and answering the questions will become easier. Essentially, allow your brain to work unconsciously and let muscle memory to kick in.

When getting tripped up, just take a moment, take a deep breath and refocus. Close your eyes, perform progressive muscle relaxation exercises, roll your head, do some ankle pumps and then jump straight back in. You’ll want to get into a place where you feel comfortable being able to take care of your patients and when you do, this very important exam becomes less like an exam and more like a game. Capture that feeling and you’ll walk out with confidence rather than worry about your exam score for a week.

Being proactive is key and here are just some wisdom pearls before you go into your PT exam. So, from now until your PT exam date, what’s your plan of action to get into the zone?

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Miye https://therapyexamprep.com <![CDATA[Free Live Webinars for October NPTE]]> https://therapyexamprep.com/?p=2531 2016-10-08T22:50:42Z 2016-10-08T22:50:42Z Therapy Exam Prep (TEP) provides a series of three free online live webinars for the upcoming October NPTE. These online live webinars provide components of what has been provided in TEP’s course and want to share with all that are taking the upcoming exam. The seats are limited and reservation is required. The dates for the […]

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MC testTherapy Exam Prep (TEP) provides a series of three free online live webinars for the upcoming October NPTE. These online live webinars provide components of what has been provided in TEP’s course and want to share with all that are taking the upcoming exam. The seats are limited and reservation is required.

The dates for the webinars are October 12th, 13th and November 9th at 4:30 pm PST.

TEP’s series of webinars:

Part 1: NPTE Assessment Readiness – This webinar utilizes a portion of TEP’s accurate assessment criteria in determining how solid of a pass would be. Factors that contribute to the pass is determined by test taking skills, being able to apply clinically towards the exam and how other factors such as confidence and mindset plays a role in a successful score. There is a lifetime limit now on the number of attempts to take the NPTE / NPTAE and therefore want to be sure you are solid before taking the exam.

Register here: NPTE Assessment Webinar

Part 2: Exam Tips & Techniques – This webinar provides useful strategies two weeks prior, the day before, during and after the NPTE exam. Techniques are provided on how to stay focus during the NPTE as well as being able to control other influences that can make an impact on the resulting score.

Register here: Exam Tips Webinar

Part 3: Being Successful – This webinar is to help those that didn’t succeed or want to be successful on the NPTE or NPTAE. Those that attend will learn how to evaluate what went well and what possibly prevented them from a successful attempt. This webinar is geared towards providing steps on how to proceed with the next attempt, deciding whether to wait or to continue to study and how to make the next NPTE be a smoother successful journey.

Register here: Being Successful Webinar

There are no replays of these live webinars.

The post Free Live Webinars for October NPTE appeared first on Therapy Exam Prep - Prepare for the NPTE | NPTAE Online.

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